For The Love of Food

Dating back to the Greek Empire, food and dining as a group has been viewed as a way of enjoying company and conviviality. This trend of embracing the experience and not just the cuisine continued throughout the Roman era, where convivium (Roman dinner party) became a pillar of everyday life. Despite society having come a long way since then, not much has changed with regards to this practice. As per Professor Ayelet Fishbach’s 2016 study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, colleagues who ate similar food together experienced higher rates of closeness and trust, as compared to those who ate alone. She wrote in the study, “People tend to think that they use logic to make decisions, and they are largely unaware that food preferences can influence their thinking...